City of Stirling, WA, for Stirling Aboriginal Engagement Project—Transcript

[Music plays and text appears: National Awards for Local Government. Stirling Aboriginal Engagement Project, City of Stirling, WA, Promoting Indigenous Recognition. Category Winner]

[Image changes to show Trevor Holland, Stirling Aboriginal Engagement Project, City of Stirling, WA]

Certainly it was a community based programme, the idea come from the community about trying to work in very close with the Aboriginal community, and also the CALD programme, or the Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Community,

[Different pictures of groups of people from the CALD community and Aboriginal community flash by on screen]

and both of those communities weren't getting on probably the way they should, and it all probably started from that.

[Image has changed back to show Trevor talking to the camera]

We did a community consultation, which sad, a lot of the Aboriginal community were not acknowledged and respected in the community. People didn't understand the history and how important they were.

[Image changes to show a tour guide and a young male looking at something on a tree and then moves to show a young male holding an Aboriginal piece of art]

We developed a programme called the Mooro Tours, and that's all about the Noongar People who are in the metropolitan area, who live near the coastal strip,

[Image changes to show a male Aboriginal dancer dressed in a traditional ceremonial outfit]

and they went and told their stories to the CALD community. From that it developed in to not just the CALD community but the entire community.

[Image changes to show a crowd of spectators watching the Aboriginal dancers]

What they did, their environmental and their commitment to land, animals, the water, the total environment changed the way that people thought of the Aboriginal community.

[Image has changed back to show Trevor talking to the camera and then moves to show a group of ladies on the Tour and then moves to show other tour members participating in traditional Aboriginal activities]

And when you've got people wanting to go on those Tours, from the CALD community, and appreciate and understand the Aboriginal community, you know you're making headway.

[Image has changed to show a group of male Aboriginal dancers and then moves back to show Trevor talking to the camera]

And it's important information, so we engaged Curtin University and the City of Stirling, and we also got a group of elders and we did oral history interviews. And all of that collection was put into the City of Stirling Museum at Mount Flora Museum. So now we've got a history that'll never die.

[Different pictures of groups of people from the CALD community and Aboriginal community flash by on screen]

Now it's CALD community and the Aboriginals. And the same with NAIDOC Day, Stirling runs the biggest NAIDOC Day in Western Australia.

[Different pictures continue to flash by on screen]

I think they're important awards for the entire local authority throughout Australia. And people need to get involved this is a national competition, this is a National Award, and it's a national recognition. And it makes everyone involved, you must be extremely proud.

[Image has changed back to show Trevor talking to the camera]

Our council are extremely proud. From the committee's point of view, from the Aboriginal community, they're extremely proud as well.

[Music plays and text appears: National Awards for Local Government. Stirling Aboriginal Engagement Project, City of Stirling, WA, Promoting Indigenous Recognition. Category Winner]

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Last Updated: 27 June, 2016