Factsheet: Promoting Indigenous Recognition

Sponsored by the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet

About the sponsor

Indigenous Affairs is a significant priority for the Government and the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet is the responsible agency for the majority of Indigenous policies, programmes and service delivery. The Government's agenda for Indigenous Affairs centres on positive engagement with Indigenous communities and increasing practical action to improve key Indigenous outcomes.

One of the key priorities for the Government is achieving constitutional recognition for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians are the first inhabitants of this nation. The movement to recognise them in our Constitution presents an historic opportunity to acknowledge their unique culture and history, and their enormous contribution to this nation. Recognising Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, history and culture is about respect for all Australians.

Further information can be found at:

Promoting Indigenous Recognition Award

The Promoting Indigenous Recognition Award  acknowledges local government initiatives that promote recognition of the unique place and contribution of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in Australia (such as through constitutional recognition), through engaging Indigenous peoples in local communities.

In general terms, this Award involves acknowledging in your local community that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians are the first inhabitants of this nation, that their unique culture and history is valued, and recognising their contribution to this nation.

Meaningful engagement involves listening to Indigenous and non-Indigenous members of the community, bringing them together to discuss the best way of recognising Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and history in the community, and implementing this together.

For example, councils could enter projects for this award which involved:

  • hosting community event/s to raise awareness and understanding of the movement to recognise Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians in the Constitution;
  • developing an interpretative trail, signage, murals, sculptures and/or other material (such as booklets) acknowledging and promoting an area's Indigenous history with the involvement of the Indigenous and non-Indigenous community;
  • undertaking a project for formal dual naming of significant landmarks (in English and the local Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander language);
  • establishing initiatives which bring together the Indigenous and non-Indigenous community on a regular basis to share skills or experiences. An example might be establishing a mentoring programme where Indigenous community Elders visit school children, or community cooking classes;
  • meeting regularly with Indigenous residents to provide advice and inform local government activities and policies in a meaningful way;
  • developing and implementing (or co-hosting) an activity or event focused on a specific area (such as sport, arts/singing/performance, education, parks/gardens or other council amenities, etc.) to build positive relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians; or
  • developing and implementing (or co-hosting) an activity or event focused on a specific theme (such as ‘growing’ effective families, supporting inclusive neighbourhoods, improving the natural environment, etc.) to build positive relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous residents.

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Last Updated: 15 January, 2015